Improving Extended Family Relationships

8As a Genealogist there really are times where I feel closer to my kindred dead than to my living relatives. It’s often easy to bury myself in the discovering of facts about people I wish I had known and forget to forge deeper relationships with those in the here and now. But I know it’s important to make both living and deceased family members a priority in my life.

“Whether we live in the same city in which other members of our family live, or far away, or even whether we have any living relatives, our choices are the same. Our extended family can be seen as a natural extension of ourselves, or they can be seen as distractions from our own needs and interests.

The scriptures abound with insight into (See Gen. 11:31.) During a time of famine, Joseph of Egypt saved the lives of his father, brothers, sister, and their families. (See Gen. 42–47.) Moses and his father-in-law, Jethro, discussed their welfare on at least one occasion: “Moses hearkened to the voice of his father in law, and did all that he said.” (Ex. 18:24.) Though he was a prophet, Moses honored his father-in-law and respected his counsel.” – “Extending Family Relationships,” Ensign, Oct 1986, 57

It’s not always easy to improve our family relationships. Sometimes you may not even want to try when it concerns certain individuals. Maybe you simply can’t see eye to eye with your Mother in Law. Maybe your don’t like being around a cousin because you find them annoying. Then of course there are generational differences. Perhaps you feel like your grandparents simply can’t relate and that it’s not worth telling them about the ups and downs of your life. Or perhaps simple distance between your areas of residence prevents you from trying to establish anything more than a yearly Christmas card correspondence. (Read More)

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