Chaos and Order in User Experience

Outside the box:

1200Contemporary web design is a tyranny of boxes. Apps and websites are laid out as a series of obedient little rectangles queuing up top to bottom on the screen. This is understandable. The software for design and prototyping has a bias towards boxes. The frameworks that facilitate responsive design have a bias towards boxes. HTML and CSS retain some of their frame-based bias towards boxes. Even our rectangular screens conspire to create boxy layouts.

And what’s so bad about boxes?

Nothing. Responsive web design, abandoning the tedium of the drop-down menu, needed a new organizing principle, something that could make the user experience simple and intuitive. Boxes brought order to the chaos. Clients only had to say “gimme one of those long scroll websites” and the ordered queue of colored rectangles almost designed itself.

Boxes are a perfectly acceptable way to contain the messiness of text, image and video on a two-dimensional screen. Consider the case of Instagram, a user experience that manages to make an infinity of images viewable and editable on a smartphone screen.

Instagram draws attention to the excellence of its user experience precisely because we are conscious of the difficulty of the task. A smartphone screen would seem entirely sub-optimal for photography, yet users flock to Instagram in ever-increasing numbers. (Read More)

See the compete original article at: https://uxmag.com/articles/chaos-and-order-in-user-experience

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